Meteor Showers

Tuesday 19 September 2017 - 23:46:47 Posted by  Bobby
Quadrantids
Date: January 3 - 4
Constellation: Bootes
Hourly Rate: 100

Quadrantids

 This shower, visible to Northern Hemisphere observers only, appears in the first week of January, radiating from northern Bootes, near the Big Dipper's handle. This area was once known as the constellation of Quadrants, hence the showers name. Activity reaches about 100 meteors an hour on January 3 and 4, but the peak is short-lived, the meteors are usually faint, and the radiant does not rise very high until after midnight.

Lyrids
Date: April 21st
Constellation: Lyra
Hourly Rate: 10
Lyrids
 The Lyrid meteor shower, most easily seen from northern latitudes, reaches its peak around April 21st. It is one of the poorer showers, with a maximum rate of only 10 meteors an hour, but the meteors are fast, bright, and often leave trains. The radiant is in the constellation Lyra, close to the bright star Vega.
Eta Aquarids
Date: May 5th
Constellation: Aquarius
Hourly Rate: 35
Etaaquarids
 These fast moving, bright meteors, caused by dust from Halley's Comet, radiate from a point near the water jar in Aquarius, and are best seen from southern latitudes. Activity begins in late April, peaks at about 35 meteors an hour in the first week of May, and ends in late May.
Delta Aquarids (S)
Date: July 29th
Constellation: Aquarius
Hourly Rate: 25
Delta Aquarids (N)
Date: August 6th
Constellation: Aquarius
Hourly Rate: 10
Perseids
Date: August 12th
Constellation: Perseus
Hourly Rate: 80
Perseids
 Observers in the Northern Hemisphere have an opportunity this month to see the finest meteor shower of the year, the Perseids, which radiate from near the Double Cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884) in Perseus. The meteors are bright, can flare up, and often leave trains. A peak of 75 or more meteors an hour is reached around August 12th, and activity can be seen for at least a week either side of this date.
Orionids
Date: October 20th - 21st
Constellation: Orion
Hourly Rate: 25
Orionids
 Radiating from northern Orion, near the border with Gemini, the Orionids reach a peak of about 25 meteors an hour around October 21. Since this area of sky does not rise until late, the shower is best viewed after midnight. The Orionids are fast moving but faint. Like the Eta Aquarids of May, they are caused by dust from Halley's Comet.
Taurids
Date: November 5th
Constellation: Taurus
Hourly Rate: 10
Taurids
 Starting in late October and continuing for a month or more, the Taurids reach a sustained peak in the first week of November. Activity is no more than 10 an hour, from just south of the Pleiades, but Taurid meteors are striking because they move slowly and are often bright.
Leonids
Date: November 17th
Constellation: Leo
Hourly Rate: 10
Leonids
 This shower radiates from the head of Leo around November 17th. Activity is normally about 10 an hour at best, but it can surge sharply at 33-year intervals when the parent comet, Tempel- Tuttle, returns to the Sun. A Leonid storm occurred in 1996, and there were high rates of activity from 1999 to 2002.
Geminids
Date: December 13th
Constellation: Gemini
Hourly Rate: 100
Geminids
 The second-best shower of the year radiates from near Castor, in Gemini, reaching a maximum on December 13th, when as many as 100 bright meteors an hour may be seen. Lower rates of activity occur for several days either side of the maximum.
Ursids
Date: December 23rd
Constellation: Ursa Major
Hourly Rate: 10
Ursids
 The Ursids are so named because they appear to fan out from the vicinity of the bright orange star Kochab, in the constellation of Ursa Minor, the Little Bear. Kochab is the brighter of the two outer stars in the bowl of the Little Dipper (the other being Pherkad), that seem to march in a circle like sentries around Polaris, the North Star.

Navigation Links:

Comments

Rating


5/5 : 1 Vote

Share this

Welcome


Username or Email:

Password:




[ ]
[ ]
[ ]

Facebook